Home Neck Exerciser

$139.99

The Home Neck Exerciser Is An Effective System To Strengthen Cervical Muscles For Rehabilitation & Correction

Professional door mounted home neck exerciser recommended for rehabilitation and correction. Build up muscle stability, help heal ligaments, provide motion to tight, stiff joints, and improve posture. Isotonic activity against a padded, adjustable resistance mechanism, producing a gentle stimulation and mobilization of the neck, increasing strength and control which can be essential to providing long term pain relief.

Easily mounts over any door and requires no tools, screws, or other hardware. Comes with a foam neck brace. Customize your neck exercise routine with adjustable height control and resistance levels to achieve greater results.

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SKU: NECKSYS Category: Tag:

Description

The Home Neck Exerciser Is An Effective System To Strengthen Cervical Muscles For Rehabilitation & Correction

This is a home neck exerciser unit which incorporates isotonic activity against an adjustable resistance mechanism. It produces a gentle stimulation and mobilization of the neck, increasing strength which can be essential to providing long term pain relief.

home neck exerciser

The exerciser system is a well built and designed tool recommended to build up muscle stability, help heal ligaments, and provide motion to tight, stiff joints. The exerciser is a system that can strengthen your neck and shoulder muscles, thereby working to improve your posture and stabilize weakened supporting muscles.

Using The Home Neck Exerciser System

Easily mounts over any door and requires no tools, screws, or other hardware. Customize your neck exercise routine with adjustable height control and resistance levels to achieve greater results.

It is a hands free in-home neck exercise system to improve performance of all the recommended exercises described here and allow additional exercises to strengthen the front and sides of the neck as you progress. Use isotonic and isometric exercises to increase the functional strength and endurance of the neck muscles while maintaining proper neck posture.

Advantages Of The Neck Exerciser System

This takes the place of ball exercises described in the neck stability exercises book. Usually done with the use of an 8″ inflatable ball against a wall, however, this allows more control, greater comfort, better stability and a more consistent and graduated workout.

With adjustable height and resistance levels, padded headrest, it is easy to travel with and install on any door. Now you have an effective way to condition and strengthen neck muscles affected by cervical spine injury, weakness, or postural deficits.

If doing neck exercises at home has been difficult or just plain old boring, this is the perfect solution. It is professional grade and includes a foam cervical collar for initial stages of rehabilitation. Used by Chiropractors over the years, it is a great way to increase patient compliance.

Can The Home Neck Exerciser Be Mounted To A Wall?

wall mounted neck exerciser

It is possible, however, not recommended. The door mount should be secure, where there is no chance of the door being opened during exercise. There are clinics that do mount them, however, this must be done carefully. Since it is adjustable for height, the back of the unit needs to be mounted a few inches from the wall so it can move freely. This can be accomplished with the use of wood blocks that are secured to a wall stud at the correct measurements. The bottom can be screwed into the wood block, and the top can mount over the top block which remains a bit loose to hold the bracket, or held against the wall by mounting the block over the top piece. So, with a bit of handy work or help, it can be mounted. It is not necessary and the unit is designed to be hung on a door.

Tips Before Using The Home Neck Exerciser

Proper height is when the bottom of the cushion is just above ear. Keep the head in contact with cushion at all times during exercise. Only move the head and neck – not with your body. Many have a tendency to use body weight and lean into the exerciser, but this is cheating. You can adjust your stance – make sure it is stable. By not using your body, you will not only get a more effective neck workout, but you will gain more awareness of posture and muscle actions that will provide great benefits over time.

Always consult your health care professional before beginning any exercise program. If prescribed by your doctor, follow his or her instructions carefully for best results.

General Instructions

This illustrates a series of biomechanical exercises using the necksys exerciser for home use. It is strongly recommended you follow the program prescribed by your health care provider. Results may vary with individuals.

In the early stages of the neck exercises, you will be performing only short range motions. You can then advance to full range motions. Initial neck exercises use only straight motions. Rotational movements are begun only when straight movements become stabilized. If you are not sure, ask your health care provider.

Installation

installation1) Choose a door with sufficient open floor area for you to stand comfortably. Place the home neck exerciser over the top and securely close the door and lock it. 2) Adjust the height so your forehead rests comfortably on the cushioned head pad when you stand facing the door. Feet should remain firmly planted on the floor during all neck exercises.

Using The Neck Collar

The neck exerciser comes with a universal neck collar. Use is optional. Your health care provider may recommend using the collar throughout your recovery and exercise program. New injuries may benefit by wearing the soft collar throughout the day. A handy Velcro fastener allows ease of application and adjustment. The collar encourages rapid stabilization of injured soft tissue. Here are some guidelines for appropriate placement:

rehab collar frontrehab collar back
Days 1-10: Velcro in front position the neck collar with the velcro fastening in the front. This stabilizes the neck in a semi-flexed posture allowing for maximal support for pain and swelling.Days 11-24: Velcro in backPosition the neck collar with the velcro fastening in the back. This stabilizes the neck in the normal lordotic posture allowing for maximal support for joint healing.

Here is a recommended schedule for wearing the neck collar which you can review with your health care professional.

DayCollar OnCollar Off
1-36 hrs.1 hr.
4-103-5 hrs.1-2 hrs.
11-172-4 hrs.2-3 hrs.
18-241-2 hrs.3-4 hrs.

Neck Exercise Progress Chart

The progress chart is in the pictures at the top of the page. It can be printed from the picture above or the printout neck exercise progress chart. It is a simple, efficient method of recording your achievements and progress toward a fully functional neck. It is recommended you work closely with a health care professional relating your specific problems and abilities. You can print out the form and monitor your progress.

Phase 1 – Short Range Exercises with Collar

forward leanforward lean
Forward Lean Neck Exercise 1

Face the door and lean slightly forward until your forehead contacts the head pad. With the entire body, begin the exercise by leaning forward, being careful to exercise only with a slow, pain free motion.

Forward Lean Neck Exercise 2

Return to the starting position. You may steady yourself with one hand on the door but do not let your arm muscles provide force of movement.

backward leanbackward lean
Backward Lean Neck Exercise 1

Face away from the door and lean slightly backward until the back of your head contacts the padded home neck exerciser head pad. With the entire body, begin the exercise by leaning backward, being careful to exercise only with a slow, pain free motion.

Backward Lean Neck Exercise 2

Return to the starting position. You may steady yourself with one hand on the door but do not let your arm muscles provide force of movement.

lateral leanlateral lean
Lateral Lean Right Neck Exercise 1

Stand sideways so that the right side of your head contacts the head pad. With the entire body, begin the exercise by leaning sideways to the right, being careful to exercise only with a slow, pain free motion.

Lateral Lean Right Neck Exercise 2

Return to the starting position. You may steady yourself with one hand on the door but do not let your arm muscles provide force of movement.

lateral leanlateral lean
Lateral Lean Left Neck Exercise 1

Stand sideways so that the right side of your head contacts the head pad. With the entire body, begin the exercise by leaning sideways to the left, being careful to exercise only with a slow, pain free motion.

Lateral Lean Left Neck Exercise 2

Return to the starting position. You may steady yourself with one hand on the door but do not let your arm muscles provide force of movement.

Phase 2 – Full Range Exercises without Collar

forward pushbackward push
Forward Push Neck Exercise

Stand facing the door with your head contacting the head pad. Begin the neck exercise with the forehead only pushing straight forward. Return to starting position.

Backward Push Right Neck Exercise

Stand with back to door and your head contacting the head pad. Begin the exercise with the head only pushing straight back. Return to starting position.

flexionextension
Flexion Neck Exercise

Stand facing the door with your forehead contacting the head pad. Push downward with your forehead and your chin dropping down to your chest. Return to starting position.

Extension Neck Exercise

Stand with back to door and your head contacting the head pad. Begin the exercise with the head only pushing downward and your chin lifting up. Return to starting position.

lateral flexionlateral flexion
Lateral Flexion Neck Exercise 1

Stand with left or right side to door and make contact with side of head and head pad.

Lateral Flexion Neck Exercise 2

Begin neck exercise by pushing toward the door and downward by dropping your ear to the shoulder. Return to starting position.

rotationrotation
Rotation Neck Exercise 1

Stand with left or right side to door and make contact with side of head and head pad.

Rotation Neck Exercise 2

Begin neck exercise by pushing toward the door by rotating your chin toward your shoulder. Return to starting position.

Phase 3 – Posture Correction Exercises

left tiltleft tilt
Left Tilt Posture – Left Lateral Flexion

The above posture reveals a low left ear or left head tilt.

Corrective Exercise – Right Lateral Flexion

Stand with your right side facing the door. Make contact with the side of your head to the head pad. Slowly push the head pad with your head toward the door while dropping your ear to your right shoulder.

right tiltcorrection
Right Tilt Posture – Right Lateral Flexion

The above posture reveals a low right ear or right head tilt.

Corrective Exercise – Left Lateral Flexion

Stand with your left side facing the door. Make contact with the side of your head to the head pad. Slowly push the head pad with your head toward the door while dropping your ear to your left shoulder.

left rotationcorrective neck exercise
Left Rotation Posture

The above posture reveals the chin and nose rotated to the left.

Corrective Exercise – Right Rotation

Stand with your right side facing the door. Make contact with the side of your head to the head pad. Start with head pad just behind the ear and slowly push the pad with your head toward the door while rotating your chin toward your right shoulder.

right rotationcorrection
Right Rotation Posture

The above posture reveals the chin and nose rotated to the right.

Corrective Exercise – Left Rotation

Stand with your right side facing the door. Make contact with the side of your head to the head pad. Start with head pad just behind the ear and slowly push the pad with your head toward the door while rotating your chin toward your left shoulder.

extensioncorrection
Neck Extension Posture

The above posture reveals the chin up and high and the appearance of the individual looking at the ceiling.

Corrective Exercise – Neck Flexion

Stand facing the door. Make contact with your forehead to the home neck exerciser head pad. Slowly push the pad with your head toward the door while tilting your chin down toward your chest.

neck flexioncorrective exercise
Neck Flexion Posture

The above posture reveals the chin down the appearance of the individual looking down at the floor.

Corrective Exercise – Neck Extension

Stand with your back to the door. Make contact with the back of your head to the head pad. Slowly push the pad with your head toward the door while tilting your head backward.

forward head posturecorrective neck exerciser
Head Forward Posture

The above posture reveals the ear forward of the shoulder and chin level.

Corrective Exercise – Posterior Translation

Stand with your back toward the door. Make contact with the back of your head to the head pad. Slowly move your head backward into the head pad while keeping your chin level.

retractioncorrection
Head Back Posture

The above posture reveals the ear behind the shoulder and chin level.

Corrective Exercise – Anterior Translation

Stand facing the door. Make contact with your forehead to the head pad. Slowly push your head forward into the head pad while keeping your chin level.

translationcorrection
Left Translation Posture

The above posture reveals the eyes level and the head shifted to the left.

Corrective Exercise – Right Translation

Stand with your right side facing the door. Make contact with the right side of your head to the head pad. Slowly push the pad with your head toward the door while keeping your eyes level.

translationcorrection
Right Translation Posture

The above posture reveals the eyes level and the head shifted to the rightt.

Corrective Exercise – Left Translation

Stand with your left side facing the door. Make contact with the left side of your head to the home neck exerciser head pad. Slowly push the pad with your head toward the door while keeping your eyes level.

Author Bio

Dr. Steve has treated thousands of neck, shoulder and back conditions since graduating Chiropractic College in 1987 and during his involvement in Martial Arts. He holds certifications as a Peer Review Consultant, in Physiological Therapeutics, Modic Antibiotic Spinal Therapy, and specialized further in Myofascial Release Techniques. No longer in active practice, he authors articles for NeckSolutions and works with special products for ALS patients as well as other neuromuscular conditions.